What You Should Know About Bitcoin

The following is a guest post

All of a sudden, Bitcoin seems to be one of the hottest topics in investing. It’s not exactly new because it first emerged several years ago and has been gaining attention and influence ever since. But in the last 12 to 18 months people certainly seem to be starting to take it more seriously. Specifically, some are starting to address the idea of buying Bitcoin to fund retirement.

Whether or not this is a good idea isn’t a question you can answer by reading one article. Like most any other type of investment, buying Bitcoin carries some risk, and it shouldn’t be done lightly. But Bitcoin should be evaluated at least, given its growing significance both as a currency and a commodity. Given that, here are a few things you should know about it.

What Is It?

If you’re not sure about the answer to this question, don’t worry. A lot of people are still a little unclear on the details. Bitcoin is a complex concept, but not one that’s necessarily difficult to grasp. Basically, it’s a brand new currency that exists solely in digital form. There’s a finite amount of Bitcoin that can be generated (only 21 million), and it’s initially acquired via a mathematical “mining” process. But most people don’t really need to know about that part. What you need to know is that once it’s been mined, Bitcoin is out in the world and can be traded and stored as digital wealth. You can literally buy it with your own currency and use it to purchase goods and services at participating merchants. Or, if you wish, store it away on a safe digital platform as an investment to be sold later.

Continue reading

Which Companies Affect the Value of the S&P 500 Index?

The following is a 3rd party contribution

Index trading online enables traders to invest in major national indices such as the French CAC40, the German DAX30, and the British FTSE 100. The 3 major Wall Street stock indices are the DJIA (Dow Jones Industrial Average), the S&P 500 (Standard & Poor’s 500) and the Nasdaq.

The Dow usually gets most of the attention, but the S&P 500 is more important to traders and is generally considered the most representative of the U.S. economy, as it is made up of 500 leading companies.

Founded on March 4th, 1957, the S&P 500 represents about 80% of U.S. market capitalisation. It is the most accurate tool for investors to monitor the overall health of the U.S. economy and is widely accepted as the best gauge of large cap equities. Worldwide indices are highly correlated and U.S. markets are usually the leading indicators of global economic forces, with European and Asian markets often following their performance.

Continue reading

The Best Sources of Capital for an Events Startup Business

The following is a 3rd party contribution

In most business startups financing is usually a concern. Entrepreneurs are faced with a hard time trying to bring to life what they have envisioned for their startup. It can be disheartening when you compare all the beauty and greatness dreamed of and the limitations in access to funding.

However, just because funds are scarce doesn’t mean taking money from any source. Some sources of capital are incompatible with your business model and can wreak havoc to the startup.

There are institutions and individuals with zeal to see entrepreneurs transform ideas into success stories. In this article, we will point out some of the best sources of finance for an events business.

Family and friends

Apart from serving as a source of low-cost capital, they will also provide the required social proof for outside investors. When pitching this group, make sure you communicate the idea clearly enough to make them believe in you.

Even when they can’t provide large sums of money, they offer a valuable ingredient in startup funding. Most professional investors will be keen to see if the people closest to you believe in the proposed business. If they do, that could mean money flowing in towards your course.

Continue reading

Understanding Health Savings Accounts

The following is a 3rd party contirbution
Even with insurance, the cost of healthcare in America can still feel like sustaining another injury, only this time it’s to your wallet. A new type of personal savings account, called a health savings account (HSA) can make it more affordable for certain individuals to pay for medical costs without ruining their budget or bank account. Learn how HSAs work as well as their advantages and disadvantages.

Definition

An HSA works much like any other personal savings account, but they’re only available to individuals who have a high-deductible health insurance plan. Even though these insured individuals have high deductibles, their monthly premiums are often low. If you like the idea of getting your up-front healthcare costs as low as possible, a high-deductible plan might be perfect for you. Generally, HSAs are a better fit for those who are near retirement and those in a financial position where they can save for future health care expenses.

Continue reading

Can A Rules-Based Investing Framework Improve Your Stock Market Results?

The following is a guest post. Jay Delaworth is the founder of Intelligent Trend Follower, where each week you can get actionable investment ideas and free educational content designed to help you apply a rules-based framework to limit risk and reduce stress in the stock market.

When you were a kid, did you follow the rules?

Did you clean your room, wash your hands before dinner, and always play nice with others?

It’s funny, as children, we are constantly told to obey all kinds of rules. Then, as we grow up and acquire our independence, the shackles of rules slowly loosen their grip.

We get more freedom, more leniency and more trust. Suddenly, you realize you’re an adult who can do whatever you want, whenever you want (so long as you don’t break any laws).

But why does this matter?

Well, let me put it this way:

  • Do you ever look at your investment portfolio and wonder why you own some of the stocks in there?
  • Do you ever scratch your head and wonder whether you should buy, sell or hold?
  • Have you ever bought a stock based on a tip or news story, only to end up unsure what to do with it?

The reason I ask is because I believe these common errors can easily be avoided. All it takes are a few simple rules you can use to make better investment decisions. So in this blog post, I want to show you why (and exactly how) you can start using rules to help your investing.

Continue reading